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Stamps are probably the worst kind of kipple there is. (Walther F. Lake)

Archive for januar, 2011

BABELBORDET 31. JANUAR 2011

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januar 31st, 2011 at 8:00 am

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MEN SÅ EN DAG BLEV DER FUNDET OLIE I BAGHAVEN

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se det store billede her: panorama på wikimedia

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januar 30th, 2011 at 8:00 am

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LEGO MINIBOKSE

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januar 29th, 2011 at 8:00 am

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MAGASINER I GULVHØJDE

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januar 28th, 2011 at 8:00 am

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ELEPHANT WALK

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| F-16 Kunsan AB |

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januar 27th, 2011 at 8:00 am

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WESTLAND WHIRLWIND

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januar 26th, 2011 at 8:00 am

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panserskib

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januar 25th, 2011 at 8:00 am

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peder skram 1908

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januar 24th, 2011 at 10:00 am

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Canberra PR.9

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CANBERRA-B15-45SQAUDRON

Canberra B15 45sqn.

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januar 7th, 2011 at 10:00 am

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TU-95

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TU95

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januar 6th, 2011 at 10:00 am

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VERDENSBROEN

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januar 5th, 2011 at 10:00 am

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STANISLAW LEM

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januar 4th, 2011 at 8:00 am

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DORIS LESSING – SHIKASTA

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Re: Colonised Planet 5, Shikasta (often shortened to Shikasta) is a 1979 science fiction novel by British Nobel Prize in Literature-winner Doris Lessing, and is the first book in her five-book Canopus in Argos series. It was first published in the United States in October 1979 by Alfred A. Knopf, and in the United Kingdom in November 1979 by Jonathan Cape. Shikasta is also the name of the fictional planet featured in the novel.

Subtitled “Personal, psychological, historical documents relating to visit by Johor (George Sherban) Emissary (Grade 9) 87th of the Period of the Last Days”, Shikasta is the history of the planet Shikasta (Earth) under the influence of three galactic empires, Canopus, Sirius, and their mutual enemy, Puttiora. The book is presented in the form of a series of reports by Canopean emissaries to Shikasta who document the planet’s prehistory, its degeneration leading to the “Century of Destruction” (the 20th century), and the Apocalypse (World War III).

Shikasta draws on the Old Testament and is influenced by spiritual and mystical themes in Sufism, an Islamic belief system which Lessing had taken an interest in in the mid-1960s. The book represented a major shift of focus in Lessing’s writing, from realism to science fiction, and this disappointed many of her readers. It received mixed reviews from critics. Some were impressed by the scope and vision of the book, with one reviewer calling it “an audacious and disturbing work from one of the world’s great living writers”. Others were critical of the novel’s bleakness, that humanity has no free will and that their fate lies in the hands of galactic empires.

The story of Shikasta is retold in the third book of the Canopus series, The Sirian Experiments (1980), this time from the point of view of Sirius. Shikasta reappears in the fourth book in the series, The Making of the Representative for Planet 8 (1982), and the Zones, briefly mentioned in Shikasta, are the subject of the second book in the series, The Marriages Between Zones Three, Four and Five (1980).

Canopus, a benevolent galactic empire centred at Canopus in the constellation Argo Navis, colonise a young and promising planet they name Rohanda (the fruitful). They nurture its bourgeoning humanoids and accelerate their evolution. When the Natives are ready, Canopus impose a “Lock” on Rohanda that links it via “astral currents” to the harmony and strength of the Canopean Empire. In addition to Canopus, two other empires also establish a presence on the planet: their ally, Sirius from the star of the same name, and their mutual enemy, Puttiora. The Sirians confine their activities largely to genetic experiments on the southern continents during Rohanda’s prehistory (described in Lessing’s third book in the Canopus series, The Sirian Experiments), while the Shammat of Puttiora remain dormant, waiting for opportunities to strike.

For many millennia the Natives of Rohanda prosper in a Canopean induced climate of peaceful coexistence and accelerated development. Then an unforeseen “cosmic re-alignment” puts Rohanda out of phase with Canopus which causes the Lock to break. Deprived of Canopus’s resources and a steady stream of a substance called SOWF (substance-of-we-feeling), the Natives develop a “Degenerative Disease” that puts the goals of the individual ahead of those of the community. The Shammat exploit this disturbance and begin undermining Canopus’s influence by infecting the Natives with their evil ways. As Rohanda degenerates into greed and conflict, the Canopeans reluctantly change its name to Shikasta (the stricken). Later in the book, Shikasta is identified as Earth, or an allegorical Earth.

In an attempt to salvage Canopus’s plans for Shikasta and correct the Natives’ decline, Canopean emissaries are sent to the planet. Johor is one such emissary, who takes on the form of a Native and begins identifying those individuals who have not degenerated too far and are amenable to his corrective instructions. Johor then sends those he has successfully “converted” to spread the word among other Natives, and soon isolated communities begin to return to the pre-Shikastan days. But without the SOWF and Shammat’s influence over the Natives, Canopus is fighting a losing battle and the planet declines further. By the Shikastan’s 20th century, the planet has degenerated into war and self-destruction. Johor returns, but this time through Zone 6 from which he is born on the planet (incarnated) as a Shikastan, George Sherban. As Sherban grows up he establishes contact with other Canopeans in disguise and then resumes his work trying to help the Shikastans. But famine and unemployment grow, and anarchy spreads.

On the eve of World War III Sherban and other emissaries relocate a small number of promising Shikastans to remote locations to escape the coming nuclear holocaust. The war reduces Shikasta’s population by 99% and sweeps the planet clean of the “barbarians”. The Shammat, who set the Shikastans on a course of self-destruction, self-destruct themselves and withdraw from the planet. The Canopeans help the survivors rebuild their lives and re-align themselves with Canopus. With a strengthened Lock and the SOWF flowing freely again, harmony and prosperity returns to Shikasta.

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januar 3rd, 2011 at 8:00 am

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JACK L. CHALKER

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Jack Laurence Chalker (December 17, 1944 – February 11, 2005) was an American science fiction author. Chalker was also a Baltimore City Schools history teacher in Maryland for 12 years, retiring in 1978 to write full-time. He also was a member of the Washington Science Fiction Association and was involved in the founding of the Baltimore Science Fiction Society.

He was born and raised in Baltimore, Maryland. Some of his books said that he was born in Norfolk, Virginia although he later claimed that was a mistake; he attended high school at the Baltimore City College. Chalker earned a BA degree in English from Towson University in Towson, Maryland, where he was a theater critic on the school, The Towerlight. In 2003, Towson University named Chalker their Liberal Arts Alumni of the Year. He received a MLA from Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore.

Chalker intended to become a lawyer, but financial problems led to him teaching instead. He taught history and geography in the Baltimore City Public Schools from 1966 to 1978, most notably at Baltimore City College and the now closed Southwest Senior High School. Chalker lectured on science fiction and technology at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C., the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland, and numerous universities.

Chalker was married in 1978 and had two sons.

Chalker’s hobbies included esoteric audio, travel, and working on science-fiction convention committees. He also had a great interest in ferryboats, at his fiancee’s suggestion, their marriage was performed on the Roaring Bull boat, part of the Millersburg Ferry, in the middle of the Susquehanna River in Pennsylvania.

Chalker joined the Washington Science Fiction Association in 1958, and in 1963 he and two friends founded the Baltimore Science Fiction Society. Chalker attended every World Science Fiction Convention, bar one, from 1965 until 2004. He published an amateur SF journal, Mirage, from 1960 to 1971 (a Hugo nominee in 1963 for Best Fanzine), producing ten issues another journal, Interjection, ran 1968–1987 in association with the Fantasy Amateur Press Association. Chalker also founded a publishing house, Mirage Press, Ltd., for releasing nonfiction and bibliographic works on science fiction and fantasy.

Chalker enjoyed reading authors such as Eric Frank Russell, James White, Philip José Farmer, Raymond F. Jones, Robert A. Heinlein, and Jack Vance.

Chalker’s awards included the Daedalus Award (1983), The Gold Medal of the West Coast Review of Books (1984), Skylark Award (1980), and the Hamilton-Brackett Memorial Award (1979. He was a nominee for the John W. Campbell Award twice and for the Hugo Award twice. Chalker was posthumously awarded the Phoenix Award by the Southern Fandom Confederation on April 9, 2005.

In 1967, Chalker founded the Baltimore Science Fiction Society and he was a three term treasurer of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America. Chalker was also the co-author (with Mark Owings) of The Science Fantasy Publishers (third edition in 1991, updated annually), published by Mirage Press, Ltd, a bibliographic guide to genre small press publishers which was a Hugo Award nominee in 1992. The Maryland Young Writers Contest, sponsored by the Baltimore Science Fiction Society,was renamed “‘The Jack L. Chalker Young Writers Contest” effective April 8, 2006.

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januar 2nd, 2011 at 8:00 am

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THOMAS ZIEGLER

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| Thomas Ziegler |

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januar 1st, 2011 at 8:00 am

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